News

Top: Welcome to my humble abode by Duncan McNaught, taken in Galloway, South Scotland

Bottom: Coleman on Fire by Dheeraj Nanda (Aged 17) Taken in Ambon, Maluku, Indonesia

Over 600 entries were narrowed down to a shortlist of two for the Young Photographer of the Year award and a shortlist of 11 for the Photographer of the Year award, with the winners announced as part of Biology Week 2017.

The winners were announced last night on the 12th October at the Royal Society of Biology Annual Awards Ceremony on at The Hatton, London.

The prestigious title of RSB Photographer of the Year has been presented to Duncan McNaught, who photographed the often overlooked world of fungi and insects in his submission "Welcome to my humble abode".

Duncan said of winning the title of RSB Photographer of the Year: "I'm highly delighted and honoured my image was selected, the competition was high and I appreciate the difficulty the judges must have had in choosing the winner, I feel proud to have been part of this year's competition and look forward to sharing my amazing news with my family and friends in Scotland."

17 year old Dheeraj Nanda has been awarded the RSB Young Photographer of the Year prize for his submission "Coleman on Fire", which captured the symbiotic relationship between the Coleman Shrimp and the Fire Urchin in Indonesia.

The coleman shrimp and fire urchin share a symbiotic relationship where the coleman shrimp seeks refuge among the spines of the urchin and here the female is the larger one with the male being smaller just like in the case of spiders and a few other insects.

Dheeraj said of winning the title of RSB Young Photographer of the Year: "It’s a great honour to win the Young Photographer of the Year award. Being an underwater photographer, I have always loved shooting tiny critters of the sea. Hence, this year’s theme - "Hidden World" made this competition more exciting to me.

"There are plenty of macroscopic critters beneath the sea surface and they never cease to impress us. I’ve always felt that these creatures should not be unnoticed and showcasing their images in these events would do justice for their beauty. "I would like to thank RSB for this opportunity and this is for sure a lot of encouragement for my work."

The entries featured a wide variety of species from across the globe, from as far as Indonesia and Madagascar, and ranged from microscopic insights into the development of frogspawn, to the incredible emerald hues of an Indian lake photographed from 30,000 feet.

Held annually, the Photographer of the Year Competition is open to amateur photographers aged 18 and over, and has a top prize of £1,000. The Young Photographer of the Year competition is open to amateur photographers aged under 18, and has a top prize of £500.

This year, the competition theme was The Hidden World. The natural world harbours a wealth of secrets and surprises, and photographers were invited to uncover this hidden world of biology.

The Society wishes to thank Eppendorf for their support of this competition.

Hamburg, October 12, 2017 – The new “Off the Bench” is here. Eppendorf AG publishes the life science and style magazine twice per year. The current title story introduces British cell biologist Madeline Lancaster, who developed a method for growing four-millimeter mini brains from cell cultures. The researcher and her team are passionately pursuing the question of what sets us as humans apart from other living beings.

In addition to three-dimensional brain research, Off the Bench explores how so-called super plants extract poisonous substances from the soil and use them to their benefit. A research approach to freeing contaminated soil of heavy metals? It is also plants which came to life this spring in the Californian desert after years of drought, transforming the otherwise bleak landscape into a sea of colors.

Other exciting topics included in this issue are a city profile of Washington, where the leading trade show for neuroscientists from all over the globe, “Neuroscience”, will be held in November, as well as a report on research careers and the global stations of scientist Wim Delva. A guest contribution presented by Off the Bench with the kind authorization of the scientific publication “Science”.

Off the Bench can be ordered free of charge via magazine@eppendorf.com, or you may subscribe online at corporate.eppendorf.com/en/news-medien.

All magazine content is also available online at www.eppendorf.com/OTB

The Royal Society of Biology is pleased to announce the shortlist for their 2017 Photographer of the Year and Young Photographer of the Year competitions.

Over 600 entries were narrowed down to a shortlist of two for the Young Photographer of the Year award and a shortlist of 11 for the Photographer of the Year award.

Click here to view the shortlisted entries.

The winners will be announced at the annual Royal Society of Biology Annual Awards Ceremony on 12th October at The Hatton, London, as part of Biology Week 2017.

This year the competition theme was The Hidden World. The natural world harbours a wealth of secrets and surprises, and photographers were invited to uncover this hidden world of biology. The entries featured a wide variety of species from across the globe, from as far as Indonesia and Madagascar, and ranged from microscopic insights into the development of frogspawn, to the incredible emerald hues of an Indian lake photographed from 30,000 feet.

The competition was judged by:
    > Tim Harris, Nature Picture Library and Bluegreen Pictures
    > Alex Hyde, natural history photographer
    > Linda Pitkin, underwater photographer

The Photographer of the Year Competition is open to amateur photographers aged 18 and over, and has a top prize of £1000. The Young Photographer of the Year competition is open to amateur photographers aged under 18, and has a top prize of £500.

The Society wishes to thank Eppendorf for their support of this competition.

From October 1, 2017, until January 15, 2018, young researchers not older than 35 years, with an advanced degree, who are performing biomedical research in Europe are invited to apply for the Eppendorf Award for Young European Investigators 2018. 

Like It, Order It, Love It! This is the motto of Eppendorf’s new Advantage campaign. Special offers on refrigerated centrifuges and ultra-low temperature freezers allow customers to equip their laboratories with premium products at favorable conditions. Offers are also conveniently available in the Eppendorf online shop*.

The following offers are available from September 1 until December 31, 2017:
> 15 % saving on Centrifuge 5810 R Cell Culture/Plate Package
> 15 % saving on Centrifuge 5430 R Tube Volume Variety Package
> Special offers on Premium U410, HEF® U410, and Innova® U725/U725-G ultra-low temperature freezers

More info at www.eppendorf.com/advantage

*Offers may vary by country. Online shops are not yet available in all countries.

See the video with highlights from the Eppendorf Award ceremony at EMBL Advanced Training Centre in Heidelberg, Germany, on June 22, 2017, where Dr. Tom Baden, a neuroscientist at the University of Sussex, Brighton, UK, received the Eppendorf Award for Young European Investigators 2017. The video includes Prof. Maria Leptin's laudation and Tom Baden’s scientific talk on signal processing in the retina: “What the eye tells the brain, and how it got there”. 

Watch the video now!

Tom Baden PD., Ph.D.

“What the eye tells the brain, and how it got there”. In a new Nature podcast, which went online on 4th August, Dr. Tom Baden talks about signal processing in the retina. Tom Baden is Senior Lecturer in Neuroscience at the University of Sussex, Brighton, UK, and the 2017 winner of the Eppendorf Award for Young European Investigators.Besides the interview with Baden, the podcast includes some snippets and statements from the Award ceremony which took place at the EMBL Advanced Training Centre in Heidelberg, Germany, on 22nd June, 2017.

Listen to the podcast.


More information about the Eppendorf Award for Young European Investigators.

Ultra-Low Temperature (ULT) freezers are critical pieces of laboratory equipment, retaining decades of irreplaceable research, samples and costly reagents.  Laboratories can be energy consuming, typically using up to three times the energy of an office and ULT freezers are key energy consumers. Therefore it’s unsurprising that laboratories will look at saving energy by turning up their freezers from -80oC to -70oC. This ten degree difference can create on average 25% energy savings, but will -70oC temperatures protect the viability of your samples?

This is the question the University of Edinburgh, VWR and Eppendorf set out to answer, with a project that will impact researchers and ULT freezer usage. This five year study, the first of its kind, will be highlighting the long term effects of ULT freezer temperature on sample viability and energy consumption. The study incorporates a wide range of materials including viruses, cell lines, tissues, bodily fluids and yeasts, stored at -60oC, -70oC and -80oC temperatures. The key aim of the study is to monitor the viability of these common samples when stored at different temperatures, but it will also highlight how ULT freezer performance relates to:

> Unit age
> Ambient temperature
> Set point temperature/actual temperature
> Door recovery times


There are already some interesting results; unsurprisingly energy consumption is strongly related to set temperature, ambient temperature and the number of door openings. However, it is apparent that some of the sample groups do not maintain viability at -60oC, -70oC and sometimes even -80oC temperatures. Samples can be classified in four groups:
 

Sample TypeSurvival at -80oCSurvival at -70oCSurvival at -60oC
AYYY
BYYN
CYNN
DNNN


Researchers with type A samples can be confident that their samples would retain viability after long term storage. However researchers with type B and C samples will need to be very cautious, not only with their ULT freezer set point, but the actual unit temperature and recovery rate of their ULT freezer as well.

The study is currently in progress and complete details will be released in 2020. If you would like regular updates on this study, please e-mail us at sales@eppendorf.co.uk

Watch the related video and read full details of the study.

More information about Eppendorf freezers can be found at www.eppendorf.com/freezers

As one of the leading bioprocess suppliers, we know: Nothing is as constant as change in a bioprocess laboratory! New experimental set-ups are developed, other production organisms are tested, and new personnel must be trained. With the new bioprocess controller BioFlo® 120, we provide you with a user-friendly, flexible system, with which you will conquer these challenges effortlessly.

Enjoy reading this and more articles as well as product news and detailed Application Notes in the new edition of Eppendorf BioNews!

Never miss a BioNews edition!

Since 1993, Eppendorf BioNews has been widely regarded as a highly popular source of information for researchers and scientific personnel. Browse the latest edition online at www.eppendorf.com/bionews or subscribe to BioNews free of charge in order to receive your personal printed issue fresh off the press twice a year!

Learn more!

Eppendorf Unveils New State-of-the-Art Sample Freezer at ICEBAR London

© RDA Images

Eppendorf has launched its new CryoCube® F740 ultra-low temperature freezer line for laboratory sample storage with an exclusive event at the London ICEBAR on Wednesday 24th May 2017. The new freezer line comprises 5 new models, F740i with Advanced User Interface (AUI), F740wi a water-cooled option with AUI, F740hi high efficiency with AUI, F740hiw high efficiency, water-cooled and AUI and F740 with an LED interface.

The new CryoCube freezers demonstrate an increased capacity of 740 L (576 x boxes), improved energy efficiency without sacrificing temperature accuracy, and a considerable noise reduction creating a safe storage environment. Options such as air-cooling or water-cooling, right-handed or left-handed doors, and three or five interior compartments set new benchmarks for user demands. The CryoCube F740 is network-compatible and can be monitored through Eppendorf’s new device management software, VisioNize® – directly at the device’s touchscreen or flexibly at a computer or tablet in the office.

The launch was attended by over 50 representatives from all areas of science and industry and included presentations from both academic and industrial leaders in the laboratory field with focus on sample safety, traceability and sustainability without sacrificing temperature accuracy in the laboratory. The event also included a ‘-5˚C experience’ within ICEBAR London - the UK’s only hospitality venue with a permanent bar area made of ice. During the event, attendees enjoyed the opportunity to network during refreshments followed by liquid nitrogen ice cream.

Brian McTeir, Facilities and Services Manager at The Roslin Institute, presented important considerations on sample security, management, quality assurance and temperature monitoring. Brian highlighted that features of the Eppendorf freezers had contributed to achieving a reduction in freezer numbers within the laboratory areas.

Stephen Dey, Marketing Director at Eppendorf UK said: “We’re delighted to welcome our most distinguished customers to this important launch, introducing the next generation of the CryoCube freezer range.” He added, “We always endeavour to provide state-of-the-art instruments to our customers and this new freezer will help to deliver the best possible standards with excellent sample safety and product reliability. Other important factors such as efficiency, capacity and traceability are built into this new instrument. With the latest advancements, we believe the CryoCube F740 freezer line provides everything our customers require from an ultra-low temperature freezer.”

With more than sixty years’ experience of developing high quality instruments, consumables, and services for liquid-, sample-, and cell handling in laboratories worldwide, Eppendorf welcomes this latest product to its expanding portfolio.

More information about Eppendorf CryoCube® freezers can be found at www.eppendorf.com/freezers
More information about VisioNize® can be found at www.eppendorf.com/visionize